Case-ONE doesn't live in Miami anymore :/
Me and the best Mom in the world. :)

Me and the best Mom in the world. :)

floridian-fuck:

Take me drunk I’m home 💋

K

floridian-fuck:

Take me drunk I’m home 💋

K

YOU GUYS

afireflylantern:

… It’s my birthday! :D

September’s own. :)

Contentment. 😌

Contentment. 😌

afireflylantern:

Sissy made me pretty (spooky) … 👻

dat spooky cutie doe 

afireflylantern:

Sissy made me pretty (spooky) … 👻

dat spooky cutie doe 

vicemag:

From Galilee to the Negev

An exclusive look at photographer Stephen Shore’s work for the This Place project, exploring the complexities of Israel and the West Bank.

Cool pictures and stuff

I need to stop sleeping on this show.

floridian-fuck:

I was kind of hot today go me

This is an… interesting one. Every post reads like the diary of a tortured Juliet, every picture is an overdriven Mona Lisa. Follow.

floridian-fuck:

I was kind of hot today go me

This is an… interesting one. Every post reads like the diary of a tortured Juliet, every picture is an overdriven Mona Lisa. Follow.

afireflylantern:

blackphoenix77:

everybodycomestorickscafe:

a profound film… i revisit it monthly…

This is one of my favorite movies

This movie definitely had an effect on my younger self. Sigh.

I didn’t see Secretary until I was a bit older, but what a great, deep, underrated, classy, highly-sexual film. Who the hell wants/needs a 50 Shades movie, compared to this?

broodinghunx:

supermodelgif:

Prince accepting his Academy Award for best Original Song Score for "Purple Rain", 1985

Prince > all

vicenews:

We are delighted to confirm that our colleague and friend Simon Ostrovsky has been safely released and is in good health.

I knew it was a matter of time before this guy got hurt. As a matter of fact, I remember specifically telling my friend that he’d be either captured, killed, or missing in a year after watching his coverage of the Congo for VICE. The guy just has no street smarts, no business being anywhere NEAR a combat zone. I’m surprised that he made it so long in Brooklyn.
I’m glad he’s back in the States with his loved ones, and I hope the Russians didn’t harm him in captivity. He seems like a well-intentioned guy. I just hope this whole mess makes him reconsider his career… I’m thinking he’d be a great Fashion or Celebrity-Gossip reporter.

vicenews:

We are delighted to confirm that our colleague and friend Simon Ostrovsky has been safely released and is in good health.

I knew it was a matter of time before this guy got hurt. As a matter of fact, I remember specifically telling my friend that he’d be either captured, killed, or missing in a year after watching his coverage of the Congo for VICE. The guy just has no street smarts, no business being anywhere NEAR a combat zone. I’m surprised that he made it so long in Brooklyn.

I’m glad he’s back in the States with his loved ones, and I hope the Russians didn’t harm him in captivity. He seems like a well-intentioned guy. I just hope this whole mess makes him reconsider his career… I’m thinking he’d be a great Fashion or Celebrity-Gossip reporter.

vikinggoth:

One of these things is not like the others…

Raccoons are like the kings of the cats and other furry animal types.

afireflylantern:

“How terribly sad it was that people are made in such a way that they get used to something as extraordinary as living.”

— Jostein Gaarder, The Solitaire Mystery (via observando)

vicemag:

Heroin Is the Most Dangerous Way to Increase Your Creativity
The thing about heroin is that you can’t say anything good about it—at least not in public. That’s what gangly Brit pop singer Damon Albarn discovered when, in a recent interview, he admitted that his experience on the H-train was “incredibly creative” and “very agreeable.” This caused a mild media furor, with various publications crying foul, and commenters completely flabbergasted by how he could think using heroin is anything but the worst thing that could ever happen to a human being ever in the history of horrible things. It’s the same sort of public discomfort that arises when discussing supervised injection sites or doctors being able to prescribe heroin to help addicts lead a somewhat normal life. Heroin = bad, right? For the most part, I see where this comes from—a heroin addiction is a terrible thing. Heroin is an all-consuming drug that can destroy your life, and the lives of people around you.But my reaction to Albarn’s surprisingly candid admission was more curiosity than shock and outrage. Can heroin really make people creative?
In the echelon of narcotics, heroin has always seemed to me the least creative of drugs. I understand cocaine: You’ve got a ton of ideas—all of which you think are awesome (even though they are not)—and weed makes everything funny. LSD is basically creativity incarnate. But heroin? Based on my admittedly limited knowledge of the drug (i.e., watching Trainspotting and visiting Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside), the only thing I really knew for sure was that heroin addicts often walk around looking super sleepy and itchy. Where’s the artistic genius in that?
I wanted to know more, so I called up Dr. Alain Dagher, neurologist at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (a.k.a. the Neuro) to find how, if at all, drugs like heroin can help with creativity.
VICE: What can you tell me about the link between drugs and creativity?Dr. Alain Dagher: There’s a long history of people using drugs for creativity, and different drugs act in different ways. The most obvious example of the way a drug can help creativity is that most of us are, for the most part, inhibited in many ways. Many drugs, especially in small doses, can relieve that inhibition. The best example being alcohol. Low doses of certain drugs like alcohol can cause just enough disinhibition that you can become, in a way, more creative.
What about heroin specifically?There’s another way drugs can make you more creative, which is going beyond disinhibition. That is, making conceptual links in your brain between things that you may not normally link. So, to a certain extent, this relates to madness—there are many artists whose creativity is almost like madness, but not quite. In conditions like schizophrenia, you have thoughts that are jumbled together that don’t necessarily belong together—you have tangential thinking, and thoughts go in bizarre directions, which might be helpful with coming up with bizarre ideas. Part of creativity is being original. So drugs like cocaine, and perhaps heroin, have that ability to make you have original thoughts.
Continue

vicemag:

Heroin Is the Most Dangerous Way to Increase Your Creativity

The thing about heroin is that you can’t say anything good about it—at least not in public. That’s what gangly Brit pop singer Damon Albarn discovered when, in a recent interview, he admitted that his experience on the H-train was “incredibly creative” and “very agreeable.” This caused a mild media furor, with various publications crying foul, and commenters completely flabbergasted by how he could think using heroin is anything but the worst thing that could ever happen to a human being ever in the history of horrible things. It’s the same sort of public discomfort that arises when discussing supervised injection sites or doctors being able to prescribe heroin to help addicts lead a somewhat normal life. Heroin = bad, right? For the most part, I see where this comes from—a heroin addiction is a terrible thing. Heroin is an all-consuming drug that can destroy your life, and the lives of people around you.

But my reaction to Albarn’s surprisingly candid admission was more curiosity than shock and outrage. Can heroin really make people creative?

In the echelon of narcotics, heroin has always seemed to me the least creative of drugs. I understand cocaine: You’ve got a ton of ideas—all of which you think are awesome (even though they are not)—and weed makes everything funny. LSD is basically creativity incarnate. But heroin? Based on my admittedly limited knowledge of the drug (i.e., watching Trainspotting and visiting Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside), the only thing I really knew for sure was that heroin addicts often walk around looking super sleepy and itchy. Where’s the artistic genius in that?

I wanted to know more, so I called up Dr. Alain Dagher, neurologist at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (a.k.a. the Neuro) to find how, if at all, drugs like heroin can help with creativity.

VICE: What can you tell me about the link between drugs and creativity?
Dr. Alain Dagher: There’s a long history of people using drugs for creativity, and different drugs act in different ways. The most obvious example of the way a drug can help creativity is that most of us are, for the most part, inhibited in many ways. Many drugs, especially in small doses, can relieve that inhibition. The best example being alcohol. Low doses of certain drugs like alcohol can cause just enough disinhibition that you can become, in a way, more creative.

What about heroin specifically?
There’s another way drugs can make you more creative, which is going beyond disinhibition. That is, making conceptual links in your brain between things that you may not normally link. So, to a certain extent, this relates to madness—there are many artists whose creativity is almost like madness, but not quite. In conditions like schizophrenia, you have thoughts that are jumbled together that don’t necessarily belong together—you have tangential thinking, and thoughts go in bizarre directions, which might be helpful with coming up with bizarre ideas. Part of creativity is being original. So drugs like cocaine, and perhaps heroin, have that ability to make you have original thoughts.

Continue